LOBOVIC.COM   MY BLOG - George's Rantings & Ravings    |    CONTACT & LINKS    |    HELP    


A VERY SPECIAL LITTLE VIDEO
 
LITTLE BIG BERLIN
 

I discovered this gem on YouTube and Vimeo after a seeing report about it on Deutsche Welle TV and decided to give it its own page. You can view it in several quality levels - the best is Full Screen 720p High Definition if your internet bandwidth is good enough. There's also a separate link to a 720p HD MP4 file for downloading to your computer (136MB), if your bandwidth isn't great enough to allow streaming. The default setting for the embedded player is 720p HD. The film is 9 minutes long and has been viewed about 350,000 (as of December 3, 2010).

 


 


Produced, filmed and directed by Philipp Beuter (aka pilpop)

Creator's Notes

I dedicate this film to Berlin where I have been living for 19 years now. While the architecture of Berlin is stunningly beautiful, only its inhabitants make Berlin the unique city that it is. In every corner there is something new to discover. And the best thing to do is to film it.

Filmed with my beloved Sony HC9. Edited with Sony Vegas Pro 9.The miniature effect is called tilt-shift, which originates from a particular lens that was used to photograph architecture. The miniature effect is a by-product of that. It can also be achieved by digital postprocessing.

Music: “Hungarian Rhapsody No. 2” by Franz Liszt

        


        

Diesen wundervollen Film widme ich meiner Stadt Berlin in der ich seit 19 Jahre lebe. Die Berliner Architektur ist zwar besonders schön, aber erst mit den Berlinern wird Berlin zu so einer einmaligen schönen Stadt wie sie eine ist. Man kann an jedem Eck etwas besonderes entdecken. Und am besten filmt man dies auch gleich. :D

Gefilmt mit meiner geliebten Sony HC9. Geschnitten und bearbeitet mit Sony Vegas Pro 9. Den Miniatur Effekt nennt man Tilt Shift, dessen Ursprung von einem bestimmten Objektiv stammt, mit dem man sonst eher Architektur fotografiert aber dieser Effekt ein Nebenprodukt ist. Digital lässt sich dieser Effekt nachstellen.

Die geniale Musik stammt von "Franz Liszt" mit "Hungarian Rhapsody No.2".